Horror movies

March 31st, 2008 by Ah Doe

I like to watch horror movies, but I have a weak heart……

This is so unfair…

I managed to overcome the weak heart problem by covering my eyes with my hands almost throughout the movies. Those who watch the horror movies with me in the cinema are really unlucky to have me beside them.

Nope, I won’t do disgraceful things like screaming or laughing hysterically in between, but I keep asking them: “Hey, what happened just now? What did he (Actor) see?”

In short, I donated my money for nothing.

Besides a weak heart, I have a good memory, and the worst: A very good imagination! If these are applied at a good area, I’ve already made a fortune. But alas…

Damn horror movies directors, they are so good in using sound effects to scare me out of my wits. When I was young (I am still young now πŸ™‚ ), I remember the Chinese vampires and Western Dracula are in the main stream of horror movies.

Then…along came the spirits. After watching so many shows like this, I concluded that audience just want to experience the thrill of getting scared by sudden occurrences or incidents, and they will wait for the truth behind the haunting till the end.

It’s old-fashion now.

If you survey what’s the top 10 horror movies now, you will for sure receive these answers:

  1. Ju On
  2. The Ring
  3. The Eye
  4. The Shutter
  5. The Phone

There are some special characteristics from the plot of these movies that directors must follow in order to promise a better results in the box office:

  1. Ghosts are spooky, but crawling ghosts are spookier….BOO!
  2. Don’t worry about the length of your film, audiences are willing to wait for the ghosts to show up. (While waiting, they will snore in the cinema)
  3. Seconds before your mascots (I mean the ghosts) are going to show up in front of the screen, turn off all sound effect and background music. Let your ghost appear quietly behind the main actors/ actresses before they realize it.
  4. Make sure there are no dialogues for your ghosts. They are in the movie to scare people, not to talk!
  5. I just don’t know why, but let them dress in white.
  6. Scriptwriters must design a special sign to indicate the presence of ghosts before they appear in front of audiences. Special tools like hand-phones, televisions, cameras can be used in this case.
  7. There’s no need to give a round explanation about the haunting at the ending. The audience will discuss it widely and compare their answers. They are doing a free promotion for your movies.
  8. Scenes of decapitation, disfigure, massacre, brutal and bloody violence are advised to be included. Just notify your audience with 18PL or 18SG about this will do.

Violent Happy Tree Friends

An example of 18PL/ 18SG Cartoon

Well well, as for the music section, if you were living in the 60’s to 70’s, you’d have to hire a musician or composer to tailor an OST for your horror movies. Cost does not include orchestra performers’ salary. Although it may seem that your horror movie may be a little over budget in this area, don’t worry, you are going to earn some from the copyright when other films spoof your song and idea in their comedy.

Two notable examples:

  1. The violin screeching sound used in Psycho (1960) has been widely used in murder scene. Kennysia used it in a video where he swallowed a snake heart.
  2. The accelerating semitones used in Jaws Theme can be used during chasing scenes in any thrills between human, monsters, creatures, ghosts and killers.

In fact, save your effort now, you don’t really need an OST today. A famous tactic people use nowadays is to plug in any popular songs in their movies:

  1. An old song in 1938 Jeeper Creeper, was used in the Jeeper Creeper movie.
  2. Sang by the late celebrity Bai Guang (η™½ε…‰) , Waiting for you to come back (η­‰η€δ½ ε›žζ₯) has been widely used in a 1994 Chinese horror movie of the same title.
  3. Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata is the ghost’s favourite song that she practised for her lover before her death.
  4. Bach’s Prelude in C Major was the overture for K-Horror Film, Cello.
  5. Carpenter’s classic, We’ve only just begun was played at the radio in 1408, a room with something evil in it.

All these nice songs had been contaminated by these movies. Next time when we hear these songs, it will be kind of mix-feeling because it’s a trademark of these horror movies.

By the way, this blog entry is written in day time…

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